C/1935 Q1 Van Biesbroeck
more info
Comet C/1935 Q1 was discovered on 21 August 1935, about 7.5 months before perihelion passage, and soon a few prediscovery images were found (taken at Union Observatory in South Africa) extending arc to 3 July 1935; comet was last seen on 26 January 1938 [Kronk, Cometography: Volume 4].
This comet made two close approaches to the Earth, on 4 August 1935 (3.70 au) and on 6 August 1936 (3.62 au).
Solution given here is based on data spanning over 2.30 yr in a range of heliocentric distances from 4.83 au through perihelion (4.04 au) to 6.06 au.
This Oort spike comet suffers small planetary perturbations during its passage through the planetary system; however, they lead to escape the comet from the solar system on a hiperbolic orbit (see future barycentric orbit).
More details in Królikowska et al. 2014 andKrólikowska and Dybczyński 2017.

solution description
number of observations 131
data interval 1935 07 03 – 1937 11 12
data type perihelion within the observation arc (FULL)
data arc selection entire data set (STD)
range of heliocentric distances 4.83 au – 4.04 au (perihelion) – 6.06 au
detectability of NG effects in the comet's motion NG effects not determinable
type of model of motion GR - gravitational orbit
data weighting YES
number of residuals 250
RMS [arcseconds] 1.49
orbit quality class 1a
orbital elements (heliocentric ecliptic J2000)
Epoch 1936 04 22
perihelion date 1936 05 11.63565900 ± 0.00168300
perihelion distance [au] 4.04341779 ± 0.00000969
eccentricity 1.00206616 ± 0.00002076
argument of perihelion [°] 44.895725 ± 0.000252
ascending node [°] 300.561472 ± 0.000059
inclination [°] 66.112186 ± 0.000052
recip semi-major axis [10-6 au-1] -510.99 ± 5.13
Time distribution of positional observations with corresponding heliocentric (red curve) and geocentric (green curve) distance at which they were taken. The horizontal dotted line shows the perihelion distance for a given comet whereas vertical dotted line – the moment of perihelion passage